My name is Risa. I'm 25 years old and live in Boca Raton, Florida. I have battled with my weight since I was about 6 years old, and for the last couple years, I was finally winning the fight. But I slipped, gaining back more than I'd prefer from my lowest weight in ages. Now I'm buckling down again to shed the weight so I can look on the outside the way I feel on the inside. But the road isn't always straight and smooth. For more information on my life-long weight loss journey, please view my first post here. This blog exists for me, to keep me on track and motivated. If you don't like personal posts or personal opinions, you took the wrong fork at Albuquerque!

**Please note that I am not a nutritionist, personal trainer, doctor, or in any way professionally trained in matters of health. Any advice I provide is based on my own thorough research and experiences. Please consult your physician or other health advisor for your personal needs.**

Watch my video about excess skin and, if you'd like, donate to my skin removal surgery fund by clicking the button below. Please and thank you for your support. <3



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April 23rd
6:41 PM
Above: Serving sizes (and calories) 20 years ago vs. today.

In the 1950s an average meal of a cheeseburger, French fries and soda pop would be about 600 calories, slightly under one third of the total calories an average person needs in one day.
If you eat that same meal today, you&#8217;re likely to consume more than 1,200 calories in one sitting — over half of your daily needs. Why such a significant calorie difference for the same meal? The answer: portion distortion.
Without a doubt, larger food and drink portions significantly affect our eating habits. While common sense may tell you that you simply eat until you feel &#8220;full&#8221; regardless of how much or little you are served, in fact research studies show that when people are given more food, they tend to eat more of it, even past the point of feeling full.
Studies have shown that people who ate a meal that filled up a small plate reported feeling more &#8220;full&#8221; compared to those who ate the exact same meal on a large plate (it looked like less food). Of course, satiety (the sense of feeling full) also depends on the food itself. In general, foods that are high in fiber (like whole grains, fresh vegetables and fruits) increase satiety. Also, because it takes your body longer to digest and absorb protein and fat compared to refined carbohydrates (white bread, white rice), high-protein and high-fat foods keep you feeling full. We also recommend taking breaks while eating to allow your brain to catch up with your stomach&#8217;s signals.
In order to provide a frame of reference for food portions, standard serving sizes have been developed by the USDA as part of their Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
To help you understand what a proper portion looks like, it&#8217;s helpful to associate portions with common objects:
3 ounces = 1 deck of cards or the palm of your hand1 cup = 1 tennis ball1 ounce or 2 tablespoons = 1 golf ball
Make a point of reviewing the Guidelines to learn how to create a healthier lifestyle for yourself and your family.

(Source.)

Above: Serving sizes (and calories) 20 years ago vs. today.

In the 1950s an average meal of a cheeseburger, French fries and soda pop would be about 600 calories, slightly under one third of the total calories an average person needs in one day.

If you eat that same meal today, you’re likely to consume more than 1,200 calories in one sitting — over half of your daily needs. Why such a significant calorie difference for the same meal? The answer: portion distortion.

Without a doubt, larger food and drink portions significantly affect our eating habits. While common sense may tell you that you simply eat until you feel “full” regardless of how much or little you are served, in fact research studies show that when people are given more food, they tend to eat more of it, even past the point of feeling full.

Studies have shown that people who ate a meal that filled up a small plate reported feeling more “full” compared to those who ate the exact same meal on a large plate (it looked like less food). Of course, satiety (the sense of feeling full) also depends on the food itself. In general, foods that are high in fiber (like whole grains, fresh vegetables and fruits) increase satiety. Also, because it takes your body longer to digest and absorb protein and fat compared to refined carbohydrates (white bread, white rice), high-protein and high-fat foods keep you feeling full. We also recommend taking breaks while eating to allow your brain to catch up with your stomach’s signals.

In order to provide a frame of reference for food portions, standard serving sizes have been developed by the USDA as part of their Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

To help you understand what a proper portion looks like, it’s helpful to associate portions with common objects:

3 ounces = 1 deck of cards or the palm of your hand
1 cup = 1 tennis ball
1 ounce or 2 tablespoons = 1 golf ball

Make a point of reviewing the Guidelines to learn how to create a healthier lifestyle for yourself and your family.

(Source.)

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